ASIA: Reengineer justice institutions to end infant malnutrition in Asia

An Oral Statement to the 34th Regular Session of the UN Human Rights Council from the Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC) Clustered Interactive Dialogue with Special Rapporteurs on Environment and Right to Food Mr. President. 70% of all malnourished children live in Asia. South Asian countries comprising of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan make up more than 50% of this number. Exact figures of child malnutrition in China and Myanmar are not known due to restrictions the two states employ against independent assessments. However, available limited research findings throw China and Myanmar into the same basket of states that have neglected their future generations for decades. Countries like India […]

ASIA: Upholding Truth and Justice or Protecting Religious Freedom is impossible without capable justice institutions

An Oral Statement to the 34th Regular Session of the UN Human Rights Council from the Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC) Clustered Interactive Dialogue with Special Rapporteurs on Truth Justice Reconciliation and Freedom of Religion Mr. President. The Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC) wishes to bring to the attention of this Council that irrespective of the international documents a state is party to, truth, justice, reparation and guarantee of non-recurrence is impossible at the domestic level, without functioning national justice institutions that are equipped, independent and willing to be the first line of defence to human rights violations. This principle, of having domestic institutions, also applies to guarantee freedom of […]

WORLD: ALRC urges the Danish government an expansion in the policy on the elimination of torture and ill-treatment, to include the development of understandings about the primitive nature of criminal justice institutions in the developing nations.

The Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC) has today written to the Prime Minister of Denmark, a letter, expressing appreciation of the Danish government’s commitment to the elimination of torture and ill-treatment in the world. In the letter, the ALRC has requested the Prime Minister and his government, to consider expansion of Danish policy relating elimination torture and ill-treatment, to include combating torture and ill-treatment as an issue arsing directly from the primitive nature of criminal justice systems in the developing countries, where torture and ill-treatment plays an integral part in crime investigations.

ASIA: Movie screening ‘Silence in the Courts’ in ALRC’s Geneva office

Two women from a farming village, about 100 kilometres from Colombo, were raped within one year by a judge presiding over cases which involved their husbands as accused parties. Seeking justice, the women approached the National Judicial Services Commission, the BAR Association, and the President of the country. The authorities, instead of helping the victims, converge to silence them. An editor of a leading alternative newspaper publishes the story of one of the women. He continues to follow up the incident and publishes a series of articles exposing the judge’s misdeed. Despite repeated public exposure and complaints, the Magistrate is neither charged for the crime nor investigated. The film portrays […]

ASIA: Are Asia’s criminal justice institutions capable of addressing torture?

Since the promulgation of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, out of 48 Asian states, 40 states have ratified/acceded to the CAT, whereas 8 states, including countries like India, have refused to ratify the convention. Despite large number of states having ratified the CAT, the practice of torture continues in Asia. In fact, there is an increase in the number of cases reported from the region, particularly within the states where the Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC) and its partners work.

ASIA: Role of criminal justice institutions in protecting HRDs in Asia

Human rights defenders across the world today have to overcome restrictive and challenging circumstances to undertake their mandate. These challenges could be broadly classified into three categories. They are: (i) restrictions imposed through statutes or regulatory processes; (ii) false accusations and fabricated cases registered by the state against HRDs and their organisations; and (iii) threats presented against HRDs by non-state actors, including fundamentalist religious forces.